• Spray system replaces interleaver for thinly sliced products

    Sustainable slicing and packaging of products without interleaving film

    Wolfertschwenden, 7 May 2021 – Slicing and packaging cheese, ham and vegan products sustainably: With its innovative spray system, MULTIVAC Sustainable Liquid Interleaving, MULTIVAC is introducing a sustainable solution for packaging thinly sliced or highly sticky products. This means that there is no requirement for the conventional interleaving film between the slices of these products – and the consumption of plastics during packing can be reduced to the bare minimum.

  • TricorBraun Flex Launches Fully-compostable, Plant-based, Flexible Packaging Material

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    Biotre is a flexible packaging film made from renewable and compostable resources, such as wood and pulp. Available in a range of sizes, Biotre can reduce the amount of packaging in waste disposal because it breaks down naturally in a home composting environment. Biotre also preserves natural resources by reducing the use of fossil fuel and mineral resources.

    "Since we first developed Biotre in 2011, we've continually worked to improve it to provide our customers with packaging options that protect both product and planet," said Glenn Sacco, vice president, commercial, TricorBraun Flex. "We're proud to provide customers seeking sustainable solutions with the latest and most complete Biotre version, fully-compostable and plant-based."

    Biotre 3.0 is available for specialty food and snacks, pet treats, nutraceuticals, and other non-coffee products. TricorBraun Flex is also working on a solution for coffee products.

    The new version of Biotre is an industrial compostable in compliance with the ASTM D6868 testing standard for compostable plastics coated with paper. A majority of the package's film layers are made from renewable, plant-based materials; these components absorb greenhouse gas CO2 through natural plant respiration prior to use in packaging. The package is made from high barrier materials, preventing the permeation of water, oil, oxygen, gas, or light. Biotre 3.0 can be disposed of in curbside composting bins.

  • Mondi and Silbo create paper-based potato packaging

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    Created for Irish farm potato business Meade Farm Group, the packaging has been certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).

    The packaging is the result of close collaboration between the three companies over a period of two years.

    It uses Mondi’s speciality kraft paper and biodegradable Sustainex coating, water-based ink and corn starch-based netting.

    The bag is designed to maintain strength when handling while providing barrier properties to keep the produce fresh. It has so far been launched in Ireland, Poland, France and Germany.

    Mondi Poland extrusion solutions and speciality kraft paper sales manager Jan Murzyn said: “The bags need to withstand very heavy weights while providing a solution that is kinder to the planet.

    “Our EcoSolutions approach means we work very closely with our customers to reach their sustainability goals and create a bespoke solution that represents the best possible option for the customer, the consumer and the environment.”

    SILBO business development manager Marcin Śpiewok said: “The hybrid solution combines the excellent strength of speciality kraft paper and the tailor-made barrier and heat-sealing properties of compostable materials.

    “Mondi’s speciality kraft paper in combination with our net, water-based print and unique technology was a long-sought solution in the food industry and allowed us to substitute the conventional combination of plastic and mesh.

    “We created the worldwide first compostable form-fill-and-seal potato bag with net window to deliver strong, durable, breathable, eco-friendly packaging for Meade.”

    The solution will enable Meade to replace hard-to-recycle plastic with paper in line with its sustainability targets.

    The company aims to make its product packaging reusable, recyclable, renewable or compostable wherever possible.

    Meade sustainability manager Jeni Meade said: “This new potato bag is an excellent example and was integral in our winning the Best Sustainable Packaging Strategy at the Green Food and Beverage Awards.

    “By changing from the previous plastic pillow pack to this bag, we completely eliminated hard-to-recycle plastic.

    “In addition, when compared to a traditional block bottom paper bag of similar size, our compostable paper pillow pack reduces the paper usage by 34%.

    “As a food producer, our company focuses on supplying the best-tasting potatoes to our customers, and as a packaging user, we are committed to reducing the climate impact of our packaging for the wellbeing of the planet.”

    In January, Mondi developed sustainable packaging for Norwegian branded consumer goods company Orkla.

    The packaging solutions were for the Swedish launch of Orkla’s Frankful Tex Mex range of plant-based tortilla wraps, tortilla crisps and taco spices.

  • CCL Label is Part of NEXTLOOPP – A Project to Further Improve Polypropylene Recycling

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    PP accounts for around 20% of the world’s plastic. It is mostly used in pots, tubs, trays and films for food packaging, but it is also prevalent in non-food household and personal care products.

    At this time precious resources are wasted when PP packaging is either down-cycled or going to waste-to-energy or landfill. As of now there is no possibility to make food-grade PP using mechanically recycled material – all PP food packaging needs to be made from virgin plastics or from rPP that was created through chemical recycling.

    NEXTLOOPP aims to improve this situation by separating food-grade PP using marker technologies.

    Besides packaging suppliers such as CCL Label brand-owners, universities and industry associations as well as end-users in the PP supply chain are supporting the initiative. The goal is to produce the first high-quality FGrPP (food-grade recycled PP) that will be available in the UK by 2022.

    “We have two main reasons to be actively involved with NEXTLOOPP. First of all, the tracers to improve the sortability of polypropylene packaging will most likely be on the labels and sleeves on the pack. As the largest producer of labels we are happy to support to creating the ideal markers with our expertise. Secondly many of our solutions are made from the versatile polypropylene material and we want to include more recycled food grade PP into our products in the future. This is why we are joining the efforts to get the basics right and to establish a great opportunity to create more high-quality recyclate that has a much lower carbon footprint than virgin material”, says Marika Knorr, head of sustainability and communication at CCL Label.

    Professor Edward Kosior, founder and CEO of Nextek Ltd, explains that creating a circular economy for food-grade PP packaging waste fills the enormous gap in the packaging recycling sector and helps reach Net Zero Carbon targets. “It will allow brand owners to meet their recycling targets and significantly reduce the use of virgin plastics from petrochemicals. It will also greatly reduce CO2 emissions and divert waste from landfill and waste-to-energy.”

  • Dairy firm confirms resin savings from packaging switch

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    The K3 thermoformed cup uses up to 33 per cent less PP than a conventional direct-printed, thermoformed cup of the same size, claims Greiner. To enable separation for recycling, the cup is wrapped with a removable cardboard outer layer, which can be produced with virgin or recycled board produced from sustainably managed forests.

    “The next step, which will make separation for recycling even easier, will be the implementation of our new, improved tear-tab, which will be introduced very soon,” said Greiner Packaging’s sales director, Josef Zicha.

    “We began working on reducing the weight of Olma’s packaging two years ago and the project is ongoing,” he continued. “The challenge is to find optimal weight reduction for cups, while ensuring that they remain stable in the production and filling process and during transport to retailers, and then into consumer’s homes across Czechia, Slovakia and Poland.”

  • Digitisation is Transforming Pharma Packaging

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    Q How has the pandemic impacted the pharma packaging segment?

    The pandemic situation was an exception to the conventional. It is easier to encounter an opponent or a situation when it is known and visible. Initially, during the outbreak, it was all about uncertainty. Within few months, the entire world was under its cover. Packaging being an integral part of the product and considering need of a global level coverage within a short time, it was a big challenge. The end-to-end supply chain from raw materials, packaging materials to the finished product was not equipped for this kind of emergency. There were many hurdles like the restricted movement of people, skeletal transportation system, scarcity of essential support systems, etc. Nevertheless, Packaging has a noble role to support product protection and distribution, irrespective of external situations. The only difference was quick optimization of the available resources and consolidate them to support the demand. R & D, Manufacturing, Packaging, Quality, Supply Chain, and all other major support functions got aligned to respond to the pandemic.

    Q Can you tell us how the pandemic has promoted innovative packaging solutions and their future impact?

    Innovation in Packaging has three distinct categories – Material innovation, Design Innovation, and Application innovation. Material innovation, particularly the primary packaging materials, is a long-term process, involving compatibility & stability study, extractable & leachable study, migration & permeation study, including clinical and bio equivalence studies of the product and transport worthiness of the finished product packaging. Considering the emergency, design, and application innovation got priority for development and adoption. However, the process of material innovation got momentum and many studies are continuing with different formulations at different parts of the world.

    Q In pharma packaging can all single-use plastics be replaced with eco-friendly materials like agro-waste materials. Do you think this model is realistic?

    In today’s world plastics, in various forms, are part of the product packaging system. It is not easy to replace them overnight without adequate backup study and appropriate backup data. However, its judicious use and controlled disposal can definitely improve the situation we are worried about. Replacing plastic with wood-based material will create another crisis, which we are already experiencing now.

    Q In your assessment, how the segment is set to improve supply chain workflow?

    When the right quantity of a product is delivered with the right quality at the right place at right time through a seamless end-to-end internal and external coordination and communication, then we can consider the supply chain is working efficiently. This is possible when automation & digitalization is adopted at each level of operations along with other hybrid technologies using track & trace, blockchain, wireless communication, artificial intelligence, augmented reality, etc. Connecting end-to-end material suppliers and solution providers is very crucial at this juncture to consolidate all the efforts to make the supply chain strong.

    Q When it comes to sustainability in packaging what are the challenges faced? Elaborate.

    Sustainability is mostly challenged by the timely availability of the input materials, manpower, and disruption due to the transport system at both ends. Else we have all resources and capabilities to meet the challenges, which we have already proved during the relaxed period before this pandemic 2nd wave started. The other part, availability of alternate formulation/material/design/ application is also in progress and they will be coming soon to support and sustain the business flow once study and data are available along with necessary regulatory approval. We are highly optimistic to prove our prowess.

    Q How will a patient centric innovation help packaging? Can you tell us about the role of technology particularly AI, IoT, and Blockchain in patient centricity?

    Most of the innovation happens only with the help of contemporary technologies. Hence natural expectation is the use of currently available technologies which can easily make a hybrid solution for a common cause. Automation, digitalization. Use of AI, IoT, Track & Trace, Block Chain, Interactive Packaging, Augmented reality, Wireless communication, Web portal services are many such tools that can enhance the intended end use of the product through its packaging.

  • Sabic renewable polymers for new Nivea packaging

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    Sabic’s bio-based polypropylene (PP) resin, part of its TRUCIRCLE portfolio, will be used for producing the jars of Beiersdorf’s Nivea Naturally Good day and night face creams. The new Nivea packaging will be phased in at point-of-sale outlets worldwide from June 2021 onwards and make a major contribution to help Beiersdorf reduce its use of fossil-based virgin PP.

    The new product is playing into Beiersdorf’s ambitious Sustainable Packaging Targets 2025 to reduce fossil-based, virgin plastic for its cosmetic packaging products by 50 percent. The new sustainable Nivea jars pay into the Sustainability Agenda CARE BEYOND SKIN, by which the company is targeting a significant reduction of its carbon emissions and environmental footprint.

    The agenda has set three major packaging goals to be achieved by 2025 as compared to 2019: make all of the group’s packaging 100 percent refillable, reusable or recyclable; increase the share of recycled materials in plastic packaging to 30 percent; and reduce the use of fossil-based virgin plastics by 50 percent.

    “We are excited to implement this important change in the packaging of our Nivea brand products and to be the first in the skincare mass market to use polypropylene made from second-generation bio-based feedstock on a global basis,” said Michael Becker, Head of Global Packaging Development at Beiersdorf.

    “Together with Sabic, we have taken a major step forward in transforming conventional fossil-based packaging in the cosmetics and skin care segment towards fully sustainable material alternatives.”

    Abdullah Al-Otaibi, General Manager of Engineering Thermoplastics & Market Solutions for Petrochemicals at Sabic said: “Innovative cosmetics packaging using our certified renewable polyolefins can be instrumental in minimizing fossil depletion across a wide range of further consumer mass product markets, and Beiersdorf’s new Nivea packaging can serve as a role model in this quest.” He continued: “Our materials from renewable sources facilitate the change-over from existing fossil-based applications without compromises on purity, quality, safety or convenience. Sabic is determined to help its collaboration partners benefit from this potential.”

    Converting the packaging to renewable plastic not only has the advantage of conserving fossil resources, but also reduces CO2 emissions. According to Beiersdorf, approximately 76 g of CO2 are saved per jar produced, a reduction of around 60% compared to the fossil-based jar. The project therefore also contributes to Beiersdorf’s climate target of reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by 30% absolutely across the entire value chain by 2025.

    Derived from second-generation renewable feedstock, such as tall oil waste from the wood pulping process in the paper industry, Sabic’s certified renewable polymers (PE and PP) are not in direct competition with human food production sources. – TradeArabia News Service

  • Smurfit Kappa Brazil’s innovative packaging solution wins prestigious Red Dot Design Award

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    Developed by Smurfit Kappa with 100% recyclable materials, the main advantage of the packaging design is its flexibility and the ability to accommodate different shapes and sizes of wine bottles safely, without having to use any filling materials. This design has a variety of 220 options to optimise space within the cardboard box and to accommodate different formats allowing for the wine bottle and food to fit perfectly. 

    Commenting on the award, Juan Guillermo Castañeda, CEO of Smurfit Kappa The Americas said: “We are extremely pleased to receive the Product Design 2021 Red Dot Award. It demonstrates that our innovative and sustainable packaging designs are making a difference. Partnerships with businesses like Wine & Bite Box are extremely important to us. We embrace the challenge to improve and develop our packaging designs to meet the changing needs of our customers and to build on our expertise.”

    With the growth in e-commerce during 2020, accelerated due to the pandemic, Wine & Bite Box saw an increase of 21% in sales and, currently, its products are being delivered across Brazil.

    “The new packaging solution developed by Smurfit Kappa will ensure that my products arrive safely and securely to my customers, wherever in Brazil they may be, guaranteeing a positive experience from start to finish,” said Myriam Echeverri, sommelier and founder of Wine & Bite Box.

    “Each of my gourmet tasting boxes are unique, and that uniqueness starts with the packaging. It is a great honour to receive this award together with Smurfit Kappa, as we are not only working on something that is innovative and sustainable, but also provides the best unboxing experience for customers.”

    Smurfit Kappa is known for Better Planet Packaging, a portfolio of innovative packaging solutions which are designed to be more sustainable and tailored to customer needs.

  • NatureWorks and IMA Announce New Partnership for Compostable Coffee Pods

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    NatureWorks, a manufacturer of low-carbon Ingeo PLA biopolymers, and coffee handler, processor and packager, IMA Coffee, announced that they have entered into a joint strategic partnership aimed at accelerating the market for high-performing K-Cup compatible compostable single-serve coffee pods in North America. Compostable capsules create the opportunity to not only address consumer concerns and divert the packaging away from landfills, but, perhaps more importantly, to recover the used coffee grounds, enabling their processing at a compost facility where they deliver nutrients to the final compost.

    Coffee capsules are complex structures where the capsule body, lidding and filter must be precisely designed to deliver a consistently high-quality brewing experience. Before the capsules even reach consumers, it’s critical that these components perform well during assembly and filling as well as on the shelf and during brewing. By bringing together NatureWorks’ materials and applications knowledge with IMA’s machinery expertise, the partnership aims to deliver a turnkey compostable coffee pod solution to the entire coffee industry making it simple to have a great cup of coffee and dispose of the used pod in the most sustainable way possible.

    “At NatureWorks, we’ve seen tremendous interest in compostable single-serve pods,” says Flavio Di Marcotullio, global industry manager for NatureWorks. “Brand owners and roasters are responding to both consumer demands for more sustainable packaging and to circular economy directives that specify compostable packaging as a key enabler of recovering food waste for compost. To continue supporting this growth, we saw the opportunity to partner with IMA as they have long helped the single-serve coffee market implement innovative new packaging technologies and have a long-term commitment towards sustainable solutions.”

    To give greater impetus to the topic and direct the production chain toward increasing environmental sustainability, in 2019 IMA launched IMA NoP – No Plastic Program. “NOP (No-Plastic Program) means we promote eco-friendly plastic substitutes for the packages manufactured on IMA machines. Through the research and testing of alternative processes and materials, together with our partners, we foster plastic-free and sustainable, compostable packaging solutions. IMA has also established the Open Lab where Material Technologists study, develop and test compostable and recyclable materials to be used on our packaging equipment,” says Nicola Panzani, IMA Coffee sales manager and IMA Coffee Petroncini CEO.

  • Co-op bans bags-for-life and calls for unified approach

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    The announcement comes as it publishes a new report ‘Bag to Rights’ which sets out new policy recommendations for Government.

    As part of this move, and ahead of the new carrier bag levy increase coming in to place, the convenience retailer will also roll out compostable carriers to all stores to ensure that customers are able to purchase a low-cost, low impact alternative bag with a sustainable second use.

    The Co-op is calling for a policy to require major retailers to report on all reusable bags, as well as single-use bags, to provide greater transparency to track the true impact of carrier bag levy.

    Co-op’s other recommendations include requiring all single-use carrier bags to be certified compostable and to introduce a minimum 50p price for reusable bags to create a greater perceived value to encourage customers to reuse them instead of treating them as single-use.

    The convenience retailer is now looking to work with more food retailers to adopt a balanced and joined-up approach to their carrier bag offer.

    Co-op’s approach involves removing bags for life from sale, rolling out a compostable bags for 10p and setting the price of its lowest cost reusable bag at 50p. This approach is aimed at embedding real reuse of bags in the retail setting.

    Jo Whitfield, chief executive, Co-op Food, said: “Increased use of Bags for Life has led to a sharp rise in plastic use. With over 1.5 billion bags sold each year by retailers, this remains a massive issue for our industry as many shoppers are regularly buying so called ‘Bags for Life’ to use just once and it’s leading to major hike in the amount of plastic being produced.

    “To help tackle plastic pollution and the use of unnecessary plastic, we will be ceasing the sale of Bags for Life when current stocks are exhausted. We’re also ensuring all of our members and customers have access to a low price point option that’s more environmentally friendly, alongside more durable bags at a higher price point.

    “We believe that it should be mandatory for all retailers to report on the sales of all of their reusable bags, not just single-use bags. Right now, Co-op is the only major retailer to report on all of the bags it sells. This policy would enable a fuller understanding on the impact of the levy and its true effect on shopping behaviours when customers are making decisions at the tills.”

    Helen Bird, strategic engagement manager WRAP, said: “All bags, regardless of the material they are made from, impact on the environment. The most important thing to reduce this impact is reuse. Just as we all now carry a mask about ourselves, we should be doing the same with shopping bags.

    “Supermarkets have a responsibility to incentivise this and we would like to see transparent reporting on all types of shopping bags – whether they are made of traditional plastic, compostable plastic or paper. There will be times when we forget to bring a bag and in these instances we can still reuse those bags, and at the end of their life we recycle them at supermarket collection points. For Co-op’s shoppers this means that they are able to reuse carrier bags and if they have a food waste collection then they can use it as a caddy liner.”

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