• The New Normal For Packaging: Post-Pandemic Edition

    The New Normal For Packaging: Post-Pandemic Edition

    The Covid-19 pandemic has brought changes in every aspect of life as we knew it. This includes how we view, buy and use products and by association, the packaging that encases these products. Today, consumers’ expectations and preferences are heavily dependent on the impact of this global crisis. With emerging variants and new health advisories on a daily, buyers expect rapid changes from the market to accommodate the crucial needs of the general public.

    A few areas of packaging and packaging design that have needed to keep pace with changing scenario are:

  • Antares Vision Introduces Comprehensive Label & Print Layout Quality Control System

    Antares Vision Introduces Comprehensive Label & Print Layout Quality Control System

    AV Print Inspector offers whole-label inspection, including image matching, code reading and color detection, at speeds up to 75 meters/minute.

  • New Varnish Protects Packaging from Germs

    New Varnish Protects Packaging from Germs

    News: 

    A new varnish for food and beverage packaging materials, SafetoShare, offers brands and packagers a biocide-free method for combatting pathogens, thus boosting food safety and protecting consumers from foodborne illnesses.

    Australia-based Twelve8 Technology (PaktoEarth) developed SafetoShare, which is a clear varnish that can be printed on paper, polypropylene, and polyethylene. Nanotechnology enables the varnish to fill in microscopic irregularities in the substrate’s surface.

    After varnishing, packaging materials are essentially germ-free. Viruses and bacteria cannot grow on the slippery hydration layer that the varnish creates; this layer repels and prevents absorption of bacteria and viruses for at least 12 months. The hydration layer does not affect print quality.

    The SafetoShare technology does not use heavy metals, or potentially leachable biocides such as triclosan and nanosilver, to eliminate microbes.

    Testing has proven that SafetoShare is safe for food contact. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) have given the varnish their approval.

    Unlike conventional antimicrobial agents, the varnish stops bacteria from growing on treated material rather than killing them outright. Consequently, the technology does not encourage the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  • Rondo-Pak Announces Major Equipment Investments to Enhance Capabilities and Expand Capacity

    Rondo-Pak Announces Major Equipment Investments to Enhance Capabilities and Expand Capacity

    Extensive machinery investments made as company experiences significant growth period due to COVID-19 related demand for specialized packaging.

  • Laundry capsule made using recycled carbon emissions

    Laundry capsule made using recycled carbon emissions

    News: 

    Working alongside two partners – carbon recycling company LanzaTech and India Glycols, a manufacturer of green technology-based chemicals – we have produced a surfactant made from carbon emissions.

    Surfactants are a key ingredient for creating the foam and cleaning action of many household cleaning and laundry products. They are typically derived from fossil fuels, but this new process means we can now make them using recycled carbon.

    There are three stages to the process. LanzaTech first captures the industrial emissions at a steel mill in Beijing and converts the waste gases into ethanol. India Glycols then converts the ethanol into ethylene oxide, which is used to make a range of ingredients, including surfactants. We then use this surfactant in the manufacture of our new OMO (Persil) laundry capsules at our Hefei factory in China.

    The process LanzaTech is using to create ethanol from captured carbon cuts the greenhouse gas emissions by 82% compared to the traditional fossil-fuel process.

    The new limited-edition OMO capsules launched in China on 22 April – at no extra cost to consumers – marking the first time that a surfactant made using captured carbon emissions has come onto the market in a cleaning product.

    “Advancements in technology like this means we can now reinvent the chemistry of our products,” says Peter ter Kulve, President of our Home Care division. “Instead of valuable carbon being released directly into the atmosphere, we can capture it and recycle it in our products in place of using fossil fuels.

    “We want to make sustainability easy for everyone that uses our products. New innovations like this help move our iconic cleaning brands away from fossil fuels without compromising on performance or affordability. We’re excited by the potential that this breakthrough represents for future innovations across our portfolio and our industry.”

    Turning off the tap for fossil carbon

    The launch of the new OMO capsules hit the shelves just as independent researchers Nova Institute publishes a first-of-its-kind report examining an overlooked aspect of climate change: embedded carbon.

    The report calculates that 450 million tonnes of carbon are used each year to create organic chemicals and derived materials that go into everyday products from detergents to clothes, car tyres to mobile phones. If these products aren’t recycled or renewed at their end-of-life stage, most of this embedded carbon will end up in the atmosphere as CO2.

    As the world focuses on decarbonising energy and mobility, this hidden problem is yet to be tackled. With demand for these products on the rise, the report highlights a radical transformation of this sector is needed with renewable carbon production to be increased by a factor of 15 by 2050.

    As well as demonstrating the extent of the challenge, the report outlines two ambitious scenarios for 2050 that includes the total phase-out of additional fossil carbon resources. It also identifies three primary sources of alternative renewable carbon sources: recycling, biomass and CO2 capture.

  • Kellogg: 100% sustainable packaging by 2025

    Kellogg: 100% sustainable packaging by 2025

    News: 

    Plastic food packaging adds to this issue; however, it also plays an important role in food quality, safety and reducing food waste. However, this isn’t an either/or proposition – we must ensure that our packaging contributes to the circular economy. Already, Kellogg has one of the smallest plastic packaging footprints among peer food companies2 and 76% of our packaging is recyclable globally. Most of our other packaging uses either recycled-content paperboard cartons or corrugate cardboard. We also use composite cans, and for our bars and convenience foods, we use flexible plastic packaging. We are aggressively driving cutting-edge innovation, looking at how packaging can protect and enhance our foods and have an even smaller environmental impact.

    “We’re incredibly motivated to be part of the solution,” said Nigel Hughes, DPhil., senior vice president, research quality, nutrition and technology. “We’re wasting no time in working toward our goal of using 100% reusable, recyclable or compostable packaging by the end of 2025. This goal aligns to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s (EMF) New Plastics Economy Global Commitment, which we were among just a handful of food companies to sign on to in 2018.”

    Achieving our sustainable packaging goal is part of our global Kellogg’s Better Days® commitment to create Better Days for 3 billion people around the world by 2030 by addressing the interrelated issues of wellbeing, food security and climate resiliency. It also supports United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal #12 – Sustainable Production and Consumption – including #12.5, to “substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse.”

    When our founder Mr. Kellogg introduced the first box of Kellogg’s Corn Flakes® cereal in 1906, it came in boxes made from recycled content. Today, 100% of our timber-based packaging that goes into cereal and other boxes comes from low risk, certified-sustainable or recycled sources. And we’re speeding up our efforts to achieve our packaging goal. Around the world, we’re committed to following the principles of the circular economy, excluding, reducing and replacing plastic, as well as building external partnerships to ensure more plastic can be recycled after use. Below are a few examples on how we are progressing against our commitment. More information about our efforts are provided in our Sustainable Packaging Annual Milestones.

    Exclude

    In 2018, we implemented a “greening” of our facilities, transitioning to compostable and paper foodservice products in all our plants and offices globally … no more plastic and no more single-use foam. In our U.S. operations in Illinois and Michigan alone, we diverted 2 million pieces of silverware, 105,000 straws and 110,000 bottles from landfill every year. We also eliminated single-use plastic spoons that were part of certain packages.

    Reduce

    In the U.S., we’re reducing the thickness in some of our bag-in-box retail cereal packages by 17% to reduce our plastic packaging by 97,000 kilograms, or the equivalent of nearly 35, 30-gallon barrels of uncrushed plastic bottles each year3. This project will enable us to eliminate the equivalent amount of packaging it takes to produce 9 million bag-in-box liners, annually. We also recently decreased the size of cereal boxes, while maintaining the same amount of food in each box. As a result, we reduced the size of the corrugated shipping cartons that hold these packages, eliminating up to 1 million pounds of packaging material.

    We also currently have some instances where we bulk ship cereal in reusable bins from the production facility to the final destination, where it is packed into pouches or bag-in-box packages. This happens with our granolas and cereals in multiple regions. In Africa, India, China and Australia, we’ve significantly reduced packaging using this approach.

    Redesign

    Today, 76% of our packaging is recyclable. In 2020, Kellogg launched Bear Naked®’s first fully recyclable pouch for granolas in the U.S., making it available for store drop-off at more than 18,000 stores nationwide. In Europe, Kellogg launched a project to move cereal pouches to a recycle-ready material by late 2019, which should remove 480 tonnes of non-recyclable packaging from the supply chain each year. In Mexico, we are piloting a project to replace PET packaging with material that can more easily be crushed into pellets and recycled.

    We’ve had similar success in the U.S. redesigning packaging in our MorningStar Farms® veggie foods by moving to resealable bags. We reduced packaging weight by 38%. As an added benefit, the bags help fight freezer burn, which reduces food waste.

    Across Europe, we are driving innovation by testing and learning different redesign approaches. In the U.K. and France, we’re testing refillable cereal stations that eliminate packaging with each repurchase. In Italy, we’re testing new Pringles® cans to determine how to best increase the recyclability of this global snack.

    As we continue to exclude, reduce and redesign, we’re also encouraging more recycling and partnering on new technologies. For example:

    • We’re one of 40-leading companies in The Recycling Partnership that invests in community programs and more broad solutions to increase recycling across the U.S. As a member of its Film and Flexibles Taskforce, we’re working across industries to define, pilot and scale recycling solutions for plastic film, bags and pouches.
    • In the U.K., Pringles® launched a partnership with TerraCycle to collect and recycle its cans. And in Malaysia, our local waste collector converts rejected Pringles® cans into corrugated paper.
    • In Australia, we include the Redcycle logo on our cereal bags. At the Redcycle website, people can easily find the location of their nearest drop-off location. In 2018, 7.7 tonnes of our packaging made it into Redcycle collection bins. A similar effort is underway in the U.S., where we include the How2Recycle label on most of our packages today and are working toward having it on all packages.
    • Kellogg India is piloting an innovative project with waste management company Nepra Environmental Solutions in Pune, Maharashtra. Together, we’re developing a system to collect and dispose of multilayer plastic (MLP) waste. Nepra purchases MLP from the local waste-sorting workers and turns it into fuel for cement kilns.

    More than 110 years after the very first box of Kellogg’s® cereal included recycled content, using sustainable packaging remains part of our DNA.

    “While we don’t have all the solutions, we’re hard at work testing and learning out loud,” Nigel said. “This means researching, collaborating with partners, and piloting new approaches to keeping our foods safe and fresh while also protecting the planet.”

  • WELTEC BIOPOWER RNG Plant Cuts Carbon Emissions of Dairy Cattle Farm Long-Term Purchase Agreement Secures Use as Biofuel

    WELTEC BIOPOWER RNG Plant Cuts Carbon Emissions of Dairy Cattle Farm Long-Term Purchase Agreement Secures Use as Biofuel

    Currently, German biogas specialist WELTEC BIOPOWER is building a biomethane plant for the Spanish dairy cattle farm Torre Santamaría. Since the first 250-kW biogas plant went live back in 2011, the Catalan family business has been able to cover its entire energy demand from its own residues. The farm in Vallfogona de Balaguer was the first milk producer in Spain to use any residual materials for the production of energy. 

  • New Bopp Film With Improved Thermal Resistance

    New Bopp Film With Improved Thermal Resistance

    Innovia Films is launching a new film in its Propafilm™ range of transparent speciality packaging films.  CHS offers improved thermal resistance and shrinkage properties compared to conventional polypropylene films.  It has been designed to substitute traditional outer web films in laminates for applications such as pouches and lidding in various food markets.

  • Serialization: A Pharmaceutical Packaging Must Have

    Serialization: A Pharmaceutical Packaging Must Have

    Serialization is the provision of a unique serial number to each saleable unit of a product. This number provides information about the product’s origin, manufacturing, and expiration date and works as an identifier for tracking. Serialization codes are generated either randomly or sequentially.

    Serialization is important (and obligatory in most countries), especially in the pharmaceutical industry, as it protects against counterfeit drugs.

  • Antares Vision Introduces Comprehensive Label & Print Layout Quality Control System

    Antares Vision Introduces Comprehensive Label & Print Layout Quality Control System

    AV Print Inspector offers whole-label inspection, including image matching, code reading and color detection, at speeds up to 75 meters/minute.

    Travagliato, Italy – Antares Vision, a leading global provider of intelligent track & trace, inspection and smart data management solutions for the life science, food & beverage, nutraceuticals and cosmetics sectors, has introduced a dedicated high-resolution vision system providing comprehensive inline layout inspection for webs and labels.

  • Pages