• WWP Beauty Launches Zero+ Turnkey Collection Featuring Plastic-Free, Plant-Based Packaging Line

    An inclusive, gender-neutral collection of multi-tasking waterless products in packaging that promotes a more circular and sustainable future.    

  • Berry's Vistop® Meets Growing Sustainability and Sterilization Demands

    Following the International Sustainability and Carbon Certificate (ISCC) Plus accreditation of its Berry Astra Plastique facility in Saint-Georges-de-Reneins, France, Berry Healthcare’s market-leading Vistop® PP36 patented tamper evident closure for autoclave sterilisation can now be specified incorporating advanced recycling resin in both circular PP and PE. This meets customer demands for more sustainable packaging while maintaining the closure’s high standards of product protection and user safety.

  • Rowse Honey switches to gold caps as it commits to 100% recyclable packaging

    News: 

    It has been phasing out the use of black plastic in its bottle caps over the summer and should have removed up to 100 metric tons (mt) of black plastic from its supply chain this month.

    Rowse has also confirmed it is phasing in the use of recycled plastic in its plastic bottles, setting itself an initial target of 30% recycled plastic across all its honey SKUs in 2021.

    This initiative will result in 135mt of virgin plastic being removed from its supply chain annually.

    Kirstie Jamieson, marketing director at Valeo Foods UK, said: “As part of our wider sustainability plan, and as members of WRAP’s Plastic Pact, we are rolling out a range of new initiatives and are delighted to be in a position to offer consumers 100% recyclable packaging this year and the introduction of recycled plastic.”

  • Bioplastic made of nanocellulose and mango to improve food preservation

    News: 

    This packaging is intended to maintain the properties of food for a longer period without the need to add chemical additives, as the packaging itself acts as an active barrier that favours preservation. This is because this biodegradable film contains antimicrobial and antioxidant compounds from mango leaf extract that have been tested in vitro, while at the same time offering a more powerful ultraviolet light filter that delays food spoilage.

    In order to reach these conclusions, the researchers compared two different techniques for obtaining the packaging. The conventional one consists of dissolving the components in a solvent, which is later removed. The other alternative procedure does not require the use of chemical solvents, but uses supercritical CO2 to functionalize the polymer, which provides the bioplastic with more effective physico-chemical and bioactive properties than those obtained by conventional treatment. The novelty of this study lies in the fact that it validates the latter method of obtaining this film which prolongs food preservation and, at the same time, acts as a barrier against food pathogens.
    This bioactive packaging, that is, with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties from mango leaf extract, increases the protective barrier against ultraviolet light. “Thanks to it, food wrapped in this film could be preserved longer without the addition of preservatives. The film itself replaces the chemical additive, since the active substance exerts its effect via the packaging without the need to add anything to the food,” Cristina Cejudo, researcher at the University of Cadiz and co-author of the study, pointed out to Fundación Descubre.


    To develop this bioplastic, the experts used mango leaf extracts from pruning remains from the cultivation of this fruit at the experimental farm of the Institute of Subtropical and Mediterranean Horticulture ‘La Mayora’ in Malaga (Spain). The nanofibrillated cellulose that forms the polymer comes from the chemical and enzymatic treatment of a paper industry waste product.


    Conventional solvent casting vs supercritical solvent impregnation


    With these materials, the research team has used two different procedures to compare their physical properties and bioactive function, as explained in their study published in the journal Food Hydrocolloids ("Biobased films of nanocellulose and mango leaf extract for active food packaging: Supercritical impregnation versus solvent casting").
    On the one hand, researchers used the conventional casting method, which consists of adding the active compound before polymerising the plastic, that is, before binding its compounds. The process therefore consists of dissolving the mango leaf extract and the nanocellulose and subsequently polymerising and drying the solvents at a temperature of 45 °C.
    For the treatment based on the supercritical impregnation technology, they used an extract previously obtained by the same technique. “By doing so, a better dissolution of the extract is achieved during the impregnation of the polymer, since the mango extract penetrates into the composition of the nanocellulose at the surface level, which favours the migration of the active compounds, thereby taking less time to exert its preservative action,” explains researcher Cejudo.


    An additional advantage of the supercritical technique is that the pathogen inhibition is higher due to the selection of the most bioactive compounds in mango extract for supercritical impregnation. This gives the plastic a higher concentration of these compounds than the conventional technique. “As a result, the active properties of the mango remain intact after impregnation, which increases the film’s ability to protect food,” says Cejudo.
    With these results, the research team has verified the effectiveness of the supercritical impregnation technique to obtain this new bioactive packaging. “This treatment is effective and valid because it helps to preserve food with a more perishable shelf life and also offers the advantage that it can be applied without the use of solvents or artificial chemical compounds,” says the expert.
    Whereas with the conventional method the container is orange-coloured due to a stronger interaction of the mango with the polymer, with the supercritical impregnation it acquires a greenish colour, similar to that of the original mixture, because the deposition is more superficial, which also favours a faster performance of the compounds during packaging.
    In vitro tests on food pathogens


    At the same time and in order to test the efficacy of the new packaging obtained by supercritical impregnation, the research team evaluated in vitro the antimicrobial performance against two food pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.


    With this test, they found that the mango polyphenols present in the bioactive film prevent the spread of both microorganisms due to their antimicrobial properties. “This result shows that the new bioplastic can be used as packaging to inhibit the spread of pathogens and prevent food spoilage,” points out Cejudo.
    Besides, the presence of the extract in the film increases the UV-barrier, which reduce the amount of incident light that also causes food spoilage, especially on foods containing oxidable compounds such as lipids.
    This study is in addition to a similar one they carried out a year ago to design another novel form of packaging using a food plastic to which they added beetroot extract, rich in antioxidant compounds. After carrying out a preliminary test, they achieved a product that aims to improve the characteristics of the containers currently used to give longer shelf life to the food without it losing its properties.


    The next step for this research team will be to study how this bioactive packaging responds to preserving especific foods and to analyse its performance at pilot scale.

  • Vegeplast produces VEGEMAT®, the raw material which puts a permanent end to polluting plastic

    Vegeplast produces VEGEMAT®, a raw material that permanently puts an end to polluting plastics; and specializes in the development and the production of packaging and other compostable, biosourced, innovative and environment-friendly products.

    100% bio-sourced, this compound is obtained through the processing of cereals and other ingredients, unlike traditional petroleum-based polluting plastics.

  • At INTERPHEX NYC, Stevanato Group to Demo Robotic Inspection Unit, Present Modular Assembly Solutions and Recent After-sales Expansion

     

    Company’s solutions offer streamlined management of complex projects, enabling pharmaceutical companies to rely on a single partner from visual inspection to palletizing. At the show, Stevanato Group also will focus on its recently enhanced after-sales services for the US market.

  • Xaar’s Ultra High Viscosity technology ‘frees creativity’ for label and packaging print

    Date 9th September 2021 - Xaar, the leading inkjet printing technology group, says the advanced capabilities of its Ultra High Viscosity technology demonstrates the significant difference that inkjet printing can make to labels and packaging. 

    Date 9th September 2021 - Xaar, the leading inkjet printing technology group, says the advanced capabilities of its Ultra High Viscosity technology demonstrates the significant difference that inkjet printing can make to labels and packaging. 

  • Mondi scores a hat trick at Austrian Green Packaging Star Awards

    Mondi, global leader in packaging and paper, has won three awards for sustainable packaging at the Austrian Green Packaging Star Awards.

    The annual Green Packaging Star Awards recognise environmentally-friendly packaging and recycling solutions, as well as packaging-related improvements in operational processes in production, logistics, and distribution. The award is presented by Kompack magazine and the Austrian Research Institute for Chemistry and Technology.

    The judges of these awards recognised the high standard of the following three Mondi products:

  • PACT Awarded US Patent for Thermo Shield™ Fire Suppressant Shipping Wrap

     

    100% recyclable wrap solution exceeds SAE G27 lithium battery packaging performance standards

  • Covid accelerates use of digital print in packaging to $21.1 billion in 2021, new Smithers data finds

    LEATHERHEAD, Surrey, UK and AKRON, Ohio, USA – September 8, 2021 – Through 2020 and into 2021 inkjet and electrophotography printing has secured new markets in labels and packaging. Data from the new Smithers report – The Future of Digital Print for Packaging to 2026 shows total value for this will reach $21.1 billion in 2021

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