• Rapid launch of a new 1L bottle on a Guinean line thanks to Sidel remote services

    To expand its carbonated soft drink (CSD) brands “Planet”, “Bubble Up” and “American Cola” and meet market needs for home consumption with larger formats, Nouvelle Brasserie de Guinée (Braguinée) reached out to Sidel for help with the remote tuning of its packaging line to produce 1L bottles. In just three days, Sidel’s multi-expertise team from around the world were mobilised to guide and empower the customer, using Sidel’s latest remote line-adaptation technologies and leveraging effective digital solutions for quick set-up of larger formats.

  • Xaar’s Ultra High Viscosity technology ‘frees creativity’ for label and packaging print

    - Xaar, the leading inkjet printing technology group, says the advanced capabilities of its Ultra High Viscosity technology demonstrates the significant difference that inkjet printing can make to labels and packaging. 
    Part of Xaar’s ImagineX platform, Ultra High Viscosity technology ensures Xaar’s printheads deliver high impact, productive and efficient results for volume digital label and packaging printing applications. 

  • Xaar’s Ultra High Viscosity technology ‘frees creativity’ for label and packaging print

    Date 9th September 2021 - Xaar, the leading inkjet printing technology group, says the advanced capabilities of its Ultra High Viscosity technology demonstrates the significant difference that inkjet printing can make to labels and packaging. 

    Date 9th September 2021 - Xaar, the leading inkjet printing technology group, says the advanced capabilities of its Ultra High Viscosity technology demonstrates the significant difference that inkjet printing can make to labels and packaging. 

  • Nerds packaging unlocks candy-themed Dungeons & Dragons adventure

    News: 

    Starting in September, specially marked versions of Nerds Gummy Clusters and Rainbow Nerds Theater Boxes will come with a receipt that can be uploaded to nerdscandy.com/dnd. On the site, visitors can start an exclusive "Restoring Harmony" campaign that includes a PDF adventure and character sheets based on the Ferrera-owned candy's mascots.

    The packaging also promotes a sweepstakes running through the end of the year that offers prizes like a D&D Starter Set and Player's Handbook. The effort shows Nerds deepening its content strategy at a time when interest in tabletop gaming is high.

    Nerds is providing consumers with a piece of content-rich storytelling through its collaboration with Wizards of the Coast's Dungeons & Dragons game. D&D, which debuted in the '70s, is a bedrock of nerd culture, providing a clear link to the Ferrera candy's brand name. But gaming has also grown increasingly mainstream, with tabletop offerings seeing an explosion of popularity in recent years.

    As part of the tie-up, D&D designed a special campaign for Nerds that features its cartoon mascots. In D&D terms, campaigns are rough outlines of an adventure that a Dungeon Master — the game's chief storyteller and wrangler — can fill in with improvisational help from players who role-play as different characters in a fictional fantasy world.

    Each Nerd candy color has been converted into a different D&D archetype, with orange serving as the fighter class, pink as the rogue and purple as the wizard. There are six classes in total that can be unlocked by uploading Nerds receipts, while the "Restoring Harmony" campaign can be completed in under an hour. The story is intended to be family-friendly — though entrants must be 13 years or older — and accessible to D&D newcomers. Thematically, Nerds is emphasizing D&D's focus on teamwork and how bringing different ways of thinking together can make problem-solving easier.

    On the marketing end, the candy brand is trying to link a packaging play closer to digital channels. To sign up for the D&D experience, users can enter their email address and personal information, including their full name, address and date of birth, along with a photo of their receipt. That information might prove valuable in informing future marketing efforts, especially as marketers contend with the deprecation of targeting tools like third-party cookies.

    For D&D, the promotion may bring on newcomers in the coveted Gen Z age range. The tabletop game has experienced a resurgence in interest after playing a prominent role on hit shows like "Stranger Things." The pandemic has not slowed D&D play, as sales jumped 33% year-on-year to their highest levels ever in 2020 as people sought entertaining ways to stay connected to friends and family.

    Other marketers have tried to capitalize on the current tabletop role-playing craze. In 2019, burger chain Wendy's introduced a homegrown take on the concept called "Feast of Legends" in partnership with global entertainment brand Fandom. The game was marketed with the help of Critical Role, a popular role-playing franchise.

  • WWP Beauty Opens New Design Innovation Hub in Los Angeles

    Company’s expansion signifies its commitment to providing customers with the latest technologies in innovation and design, strengthening its position as leading North American supplier.

  • Confectionery majors Nestlé Mars and Mondelēz join sector drive for plastic packaging recycling

    News: 

    The trio are joined by other major food brands including PepsiCo and Unilever in the scheme – which is though to the first of its kind in the region, to help deliver faster progress on environmental protection measures.

    Known as the Flexible Plastic Fund, it is being led by producer compliance scheme, Ecosurety, with support from environmental charity, Hubbub.

    In collaboration with manufacturers, retailers and recyclers, the Fund intends to improve flexible plastic recycling and reduce plastic pollution by giving the material a stable value. This will in turn increase the supply of recycled plastic enabling industry to become more ‘circular’ and meet the forthcoming UK plastic packaging tax obligations. This will motivate investment in much needed jobs and infrastructure to make flexible plastic recycling a financially sustainable system in the UK.

    New research from the University of Sheffield suggests there is strong consumer demand for recycling flexible plastic with 95% of participants saying they would be willing to recycle their flexible plastics.

    Sainsbury’s and Waitrose have already signed up to support the initiative by hosting flexible plastic collection points in selected stores across the UK. Several other major retailers are set to follow suit. As a result, recycling this material will become increasingly accessible to consumers, as they will be able to recycle all types of flexible plastic packaging with participating retailers.

    With just 16% of UK local authorities currently offering household collection of flexible plastics, the amounts of this material collected for recycling are low. Flexible plastics include plastic bags, wrappers, films, pouches, packets and sachets and is described as ‘plastic bags and wrapping’, ‘soft plastics’ or ‘flexible plastics’. The Fund will guarantee a minimum value of £100 per tonne of recycled product to incentivise recyclers to process flexible plastic.

    The long-term ambition of the Fund is to drive progress towards creating a circular, UK based flexible plastic recycling market that allows flexible plastic recycling via household collections. As part of the UK’s drive to boost recycling, WRAP recently announced new recommendations to support flexible plastic recycling.

    Flexible plastic represented 22% of all UK consumer plastic packaging in 2019 but only 6% was recycled3. This type of plastic must be processed in a different way to other plastics due to its unique properties – it often contaminates rigid plastic recycling and clogs up machinery – something that could be overcome by creating a separate flexible plastic recycling stream.

    The initiative will provide fully audited transparency – at least 80% of the plastics collected will be recycled in the UK – rising to 100% by 2023. Until 2023, where there are currently limits in UK capacity and technology, up to 20% could be exported to qualifying facilities in Europe.The recycled plastic will be turned into a range of products including non-food grade plastic, non-food-grade film and food-grade film.

  • Novamont and Iren to collaborate to manage compostable products & packaging

    News: 

    The two companies have agreed to develop specific projects for the optimised management of compostable products and packaging, to be recycled and recovered together with the organic fraction of solid municipal waste in Iren’s treatment plants.

    Iren operates in the sectors of electricity, gas, thermal energy for district heating, management of integrated water services, environmental services and technological services.

    Under the agreement, dedicated flows (some of which experimental) will be organised for organic waste fractions containing disposable compostable products coming from markets, catering businesses and large events.

    Renato Boero, Iren chairman, said: “Innovation and attention to the circular economy are two distinctive aspects of our vision and this collaboration with Novamont, through research and experimentation on the ground, further enhances Iren’s role as a strategic player in the Green Economy.”

    Catia Bastioli, Novamont chief executive, added: “The partnership with Iren will be strategic not only to improve waste management, but above all to close the carbon cycle, regenerate soil and decarbonise the atmosphere, while experimenting new solutions in a logic of learning by doing”.

  • Smurfit Kappa and Signify collaborate on sustainable packaging

    News: 

    Ireland-based corrugated packaging company Smurfit Kappa has collaborated with Dutch LED lighting systems manufacturer Signify to develop an integrated sustainable packaging system.

    The companies have developed the BioShift UV-C Chamber Case, a packaging solution for shipping and transporting UV-C lights that can kill germs and viruses.

    The fully paper-based solution removes all plastics and reduces the number of packaging materials used from five to one.

    The case is secured by a fit-to-size hood with special multi-use locks before being placed on a corrugated pallet.

    As well as its sustainability aspects, the case is claimed to be cheaper and reduce assembly labour by 50%.

    It also reduces storage space by 30%, allowing up to 16 additional pallets to fit in one truck, and is claimed to guarantee 100% security during transport.

    Smurfit Kappa Poland CEO Jacek Nieweglowski said: “Working with Signify locally to create more sustainable packaging, which is innovative in design and optimised from a cost perspective, has brought a great sense of pride to our team, especially by supporting the worldwide shipping of a product offering protection against viruses.”

    Signify EMEA strategic buyer Damian Grzelak said: “UV-C lights are a growing segment of business for us, particularly in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic.

    “Smurfit Kappa has been vital in helping us reduce costs and ship our products in a safe and more sustainable manner.”

    The BioShift UV-C Chamber Case is part of Smurfit Kappa’s Better Planet Packaging product line, which offers renewable, recyclable and biodegradable products.

    This week, Smurfit Kappa launched an ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) film for its Bag-in-Box solution.

    The 60-micron film, to be marketed as E Compact 60, will reduce the amount of plastic used by the company when manufacturing bags.

  • Tetra Pak calls for collaborative innovation to tackle sustainability challenges in the food packaging industry

    News: 

    According to the latest research the global food supply chain system is responsible for 26% of global greenhouse gas emissions; a third of all food is lost or wasted somewhere in the supply chain; fossil fuel-based materials need to be phased out; and significant improvements are needed to the way packaging is dealt with after use.

    Laurence Mott, Executive VP for Development and Engineering at Tetra Pak, says: “We are joining forces with our strategic partners and paperboard producers to find solutions. It's possible to make a completely sustainable package, but you have to make it safe. And if you can’t make it at scale, you can't minimise food waste, and you can't serve a growing global population. In order to bring those three things together, it takes very strong collaboration.”

    Mott says that the scale of the environmental challenges the world faces requires that actors within the value chain join forces to develop truly sustainable packaging solutions.

    Hannu Kasurinen, Executive Vice President Packaging at Stora Enso, a leading global provider of renewable solutions, says: “We trust, we share, we learn together. Our best innovators collaborate, and we move forward and we innovate. Sometimes we fail, but then we learn from those failures. We have grown much closer to each other, because we have the same strategic objectives – which are good for the people and the planet.” 

    Francisco Razzolini, Industrial Technology, Innovation, Sustainability and Projects Director at Klabin, Brazil’s largest paper producer, says: “We are seeing new demands from society and from consumers to make products and processes that are more sustainable. Meeting these demands requires a lot of collaboration between our companies. By sharing experiences, thoughts, ideas and developments, we can speed up the innovation process.”

    Malin Ljung Eiborn, Head of Sustainability and Public Affairs at BillerudKorsnäs, a world leading provider of fibre-based packaging material, says: “The vision is 100% fibre-based and fully recyclable packaging, where plastic and aluminium are not needed anymore. We still have, of course, some steps to go before we are there from a technical perspective. But we work as one project team on this because the only way that we can solve them is to do this together.”

    The challenges the industry faces include removing the thin layers of plastic and aluminium replacing them with plant or wood fibre-based materials, developing a renewable alternative to the plastic straw, and improving the recyclability of packages. When responsibly sourced, plant-based renewable materials can support towards protecting biodiversity and the natural ecosystem. This means the industry can minimise the need for fossil-based materials.

    And it is these and other challenges on which Tetra Pak and its partners are teaming up within the new collaborative innovation model. Tetra Pak’s aim is to create the world’s most sustainable package – one that secures food safety and availability while reducing the impact on the planet.

  • Tetra Pak calls for collaborative innovation to tackle sustainability challenges in the food packaging industry

    News: 

    According to the latest research the global food supply chain system is responsible for 26% of global greenhouse gas emissions; a third of all food is lost or wasted somewhere in the supply chain; fossil fuel-based materials need to be phased out; and significant improvements are needed to the way packaging is dealt with after use.

    Laurence Mott, Executive VP for Development and Engineering at Tetra Pak, says: “We are joining forces with our strategic partners and paperboard producers to find solutions. It's possible to make a completely sustainable package, but you have to make it safe. And if you can’t make it at scale, you can't minimise food waste, and you can't serve a growing global population. In order to bring those three things together, it takes very strong collaboration.”

    Mott says that the scale of the environmental challenges the world faces requires that actors within the value chain join forces to develop truly sustainable packaging solutions.

    Leading paperboard producers are united in their approach to tackle carbon emissions and have an ambition to create a net-zero carbon future..

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